0
Research Papers

Breeding Properties Study on High-Power Thorium Molten Salt Reactor

[+] Author and Article Information
Yafen Liu

Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics,
CAS,
Shanghai 201800, China
e-mail: liuyafen@sinap.ac.cn

Rui Guo

Nuclear Power Institute of China,
Chengdu 610213, Sichuan, China
e-mail: guorui7814@sina.com

Xiangzhou Cai

Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics,
CAS,
Shanghai 201800, China
e-mail: caixiangzhou@sinap.ac.cn

Rui Yan

Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics,
CAS,
Shanghai 201800, China
e-mail: yanrui@sinap.ac.cn

Yang Zou

Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics,
CAS,
Shanghai 201800, China
e-mail: zouyang@sinap.ac.cn

Bo Zhou

Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics,
CAS,
Shanghai 201800, China
e-mail: zhoubo@sinap.ac.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received October 11, 2017; final manuscript received August 14, 2018; published online January 24, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Jay F. Kunze.

ASME J of Nuclear Rad Sci 5(1), 011003 (Jan 24, 2019) (8 pages) Paper No: NERS-17-1151; doi: 10.1115/1.4041272 History: Received October 11, 2017; Revised August 14, 2018

Molten salt reactor (MSR), the only one using liquid fuel in the six types “Generation IV” reactors, is very different from reactors in operation now and has initiated very extensive interests all over the world. This paper is primarily aimed at investigating the breeding characteristics of high-power thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR) based on the two-fluid molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR) with a superior breeding performance. We explored the optimized structure to be a thorium-based molten salt breeder reactor with different core conditions and different postprocessing programs, and finally got the breeding ratio of 1.065 in our TMSR model. At last we analyzed the transient security of our optimized model with results show that the temperature coefficient of core is −3 pcm/K and a 2000 pcm reactivity insertion can be successfully absorbed by the core if the insertion time is more than or equal to 5 s and the core behaves safely.

Copyright © 2019 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Rosenthal, M. , Robertson, R. , and Bridges, R. , 1970, “Molten Salt Reactor - History, Status and Potential, Fuel,” Appl. Technol., 8(2), pp. 107–117.
James, A. L. , 2002, “The Fourth Generation of Nuclear Power,” Prog. Nucl. Energy, 40(3–4), pp. 301–307.
David, L. , 2010, “Molten Salt Reactors: A New Beginning for an Old Idea,” Nucl. Eng. Des., 240(6), pp. 1644–1656.
Briant, R. C. , and Weinberg, A. M. , 1957, “Molten Fluorides as Power Reactor Fuels,” Nuclearence Eng., 2(6), pp. 797–803. http://www.energyfromthorium.com/pdf/NSE_moltenFluorides.pdf
Paul, N. H. , and Engel, J. R. , 1970, “Experiment With the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment,” Nucl. Appl. Technol., 107(2), pp. 118–136.
Nuttin, A. , Heuer, D. , Billebaud, A. , Brissot, R. , Brun, C. L. , Liatard, E. , Loiseaux, J.-M. , Mathieu, L. , Mathieu, O. , Merle-Lucotte, E. , Nifenecker, H. , Perdu, F. , and David, S. , 2005, “Potential of Thorium Molten Salt Reactors Detailed Calculations and Concept Evolution With a View to Large Scale Energy Production,” Prog. Nuclear Energy, 46(1), pp. 77–99.
Robertson, R. C. , Smith, O. L. , Briggs, R. B. , and Bettis, E. S. , eds., 1968, “Two-Fluid Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor Design Study,” ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, Report No. ORNL-4528.
Briggs, R. B. , ed., 1967, “Summary of the Objectives, the Design, and a Program of Development of Molten-Salt Breeder Reactors,” ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, Reprt No. ORNL-TM-1851. http://moltensalt.org/references/static/downloads/pdf/ORNL-TM-1851.pdf
Lab, O. R. N. , ed., 2005, “SCALE: A Modular Code System for Performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations,” ONRL, Oak Ridge, TN, Report No. ORNL/TM-2005/39.
Dehart, M. D. , (ed.,) 2006, “Triton: A Two-Dimensional Transport and Depletion Module for Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel,” Technical Report, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, Report No. ORNL/TM-2005/39.
Hermann, O. W. , and Westfall, R. M. , eds., 1995, “ORIGEN-S: SCALE System Module to Calculate Fuel Depletion, Actinide Transmutation, Fission Product Buildup and Decay, and Associated Radiation Source Terms,” Technical Report, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, Report No. NUREG/CR-0200 ORNL/NUREG/CSD-2.
Hermann, O. W. , ed., 1998, “COUPLE: SCALE System Module to Process Problem-Dependent Cross Sections and Neutron Spectral Data for ORIGEN-S Analyses,” ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, Report No. NUREG/CR-0200 ORNL/NUREG/CSD-2.
Merle-Lucotte, E. , Heuer, D. , Mathieu, L. , and Le Brun, C. , 2005, “Molten Salt Reactor: Deterministic Safety Evaluation,” European Nuclear Conference (ENC), Versailles, France, p. 8.
Ignatiev, V. V. , Feynberg, O. S. , Zagnitko, A. V. , Merzlyakov, A. V. , Surenkov, A. I. , Panov, A. V. , Subbotin, V. G. , Afonichkin, V. K. , Khokhlov, V. A. , and Kormilitsyn, M. V. , 2012, “Molten-Salt Reactors: New Possibilities, Problems and Solutions,” At. Energy, 112(3), pp. 157–165.
Maosong, C. , ed., 2011, “The Safety Assessment of 2 MW Molten Salt Reactor,” SINAP, Shanghai, China.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

The simplified program flow chart of the coupled code POST

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic diagrams of the cross section (a) and the vertical section (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

keff and BR for various fuel channel radius

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Energy spectra for various fuel salt channel radius

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

keff and BR for various blanket salt channel radius

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Energy spectra for various blanket salt channel radius

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Energy spectra of the core of various fission nuclides weight percentages

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

keff and BR for various fission nuclides weight percentages

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

keff change for the postprocessing calculation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

BR changes for the postprocessing calculation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Reactivity evolution after 2000 pcm reactivity insertion

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Power density changes after 2000 pcm reactivity insertion

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Temperature evolution after 2000 pcm reactivity insertion

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Reactivity evolution after 2000 pcm reactivity insertion for different core temperature coefficients

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Power density changes evolution after 2000 pcm reactivity insertion for different core temperature coefficients

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Temperature evolution after 2000 pcm reactivity insertion for different core temperature coefficients

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In