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Research Papers

Effect of Oxidation Chemistry of Supercritical Water on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Steels

[+] Author and Article Information
Bin Gong

Water Chemistry Laboratory,
Nuclear Power Institute of China,
Third Section of Huafu Road, Huayang Town, Shuangliu County,
Chengdu City, Sichuan Province 610213, China
e-mail: gongbin_npic@163.com

Yanping Huang

Mem. ASME
CNNC Key Laboratory on Nuclear Reactor Thermalhydraulics Technology,
Nuclear Power Institute of China,
P.O. Box 622-200, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China
e-mail: hyanping007@163.com

E. Jiang

Water Chemistry Laboratory,
Nuclear Power Institute of China,
Third Section of Huafu Road, Huayang Town, Shuangliu County,
Chengdu City, Sichuan Province 610213, China
e-mail: jiangee@126.com

Yongfu Zhao

Water Chemistry Laboratory,
Nuclear Power Institute of China,
Third Section of Huafu Road, Huayang Town, Shuangliu County,
Chengdu City, Sichuan Province 610213, China
e-mail: zhaoyongfu0127@126.com

Weiwei Liu

Water Chemistry Laboratory,
Nuclear Power Institute of China,
Third Section of Huafu Road, Huayang Town, Shuangliu County
Chengdu City, Sichuan Province 610213, China
e-mail: wwliu527@163.com

Zhiru Zhou

International Cooperation Department,
Nuclear Power Institute of China,
Third Section of Huafu Road, Huayang Town, Shuangliu County
Chengdu City, Sichuan Province 610213China
e-mail: zw2001amy@163.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received June 1, 2015; final manuscript received July 8, 2015; published online December 9, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Thomas Schulenberg.

ASME J of Nuclear Rad Sci 2(1), 011019 (Dec 09, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: NERS-15-1109; doi: 10.1115/1.4031076 History: Received June 01, 2015; Accepted July 13, 2015

Austenitic steel is a candidate material for supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This study is to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of HR3C under the effect of supercritical water chemistry. A transition phenomenon of the water parameters was monitored during a pseudocritical region by water quality experiments at 650°C and 30 MPa. The stress–strain curves and fracture time of HR3C were obtained by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests in the supercritical water at 620°C and 25 MPa. The concentration of the dissolved oxygen (DO) was 2001000μg/kg, and the strain rate was 7.5×107/s. The recent results showed that the failure mode was dominated by intergranular brittle fracture. The relations of the oxygen concentration and the fracture time were nonlinear. 200500μg/kg of oxygen accelerated the cracking, but a longer fracture time was measured when the oxygen concentration was increased to 1000μg/kg. Chromium depletion occurred in the oxide layer at the tip of cracks. Grain size increased and chain-precipitated phases were observed in the fractured specimens. These characteristics were considered to contribute to the intergranular SCC.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Flowchart of the SCW-SCC Test Loop. 1, feeding pump; 2, high-pressure pump; 3, pressure storage; 4, heat exchanger; 5, preheater; 6, test cell; 7, loading system; 8, cooler; 9, pressure regulator; 10, outlet water storage; 11, measure pump; 12, purify column; 13, test solution storage; 14, gas cylinders; and 15, chemicals feeding pump

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Fig. 2

View of SCW-SCC Test Loop. (a) Water chemistry monitoring and control system and (b) SCC loading system

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Fig. 3

Types of specimen for SCC tests

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Fig. 4

Operation parameters of SCW-SCC Test Loop at 650°C and 30 MPa. (a) Flow rate versus temperature, (b) conductivity versus temperature, (c) PH versus temperature, (d) DO versus temperature, and (e) ORP versus temperature

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Fig. 15

Comparison of metallurgical structure: (a) before test, (b) sensitized at 650°C for 2 h, and (c) after SSRT test at 620°C and 25 MPa for 90 h

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Fig. 14

Comparison of chromium content by EDS analysis at the tip of microcracks of specimens tested at 620°C and 25 MPa in SCW with 200  μg/kg DO

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Fig. 13

Microcracks on the gauge section of specimens tested at 620°C and 25 MPa in (a) deaerated SCW and (b) SCW with 200  μg/kg DO

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Fig. 12

SEM of specimens showing (a) river pattern at the edge of fracture surface and (b) grain boundary cracks following SSRT at 620°C and 25 MPa in SCW with 200  μg/kg DO

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Fig. 11

Intergranular facets in the center of fracture surface of specimens following exposure at 620°C and 25 MPa in (a) deaerated SCW and (b) SCW with 200  μg/kg DO

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Fig. 10

SEM fractography of specimens following exposure at 620°C and 25 MPa in (a) deaerated SCW and (b) SCW with 200  μg/kg DO

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Fig. 9

Cracks metallographic of gage section of specimens following exposure at 620°C and 25 MPa in (a) deaerated SCW and (b) SCW with 200  μg/kg DO

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Fig. 8

Stereo microscope morphology of gage surface of specimens following exposure at 620°C and 25 MPa in (a) deaerated SCW and (b) SCW with 200  μg/kg DO

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Fig. 7

View of fractured specimens

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Fig. 6

Comparison of (a) load versus time and (b) stress versus strain, obtained by SSRT tests on HR3C in SCW with 0–1000  μg/kg DO at 620°C and 25 MPa

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Fig. 5

Schematic of the specimen for SCC tests (in mm)

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