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Research Papers

Oxidation Behavior of Austenitic Stainless Steel 316L and 310S in Air and Supercritical Water

[+] Author and Article Information
Majid Nezakat

University of Saskatchewan,
57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9, Canada
e-mail: majid.nezakat@usask.ca

Hamed Akhiani

Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Canada, Ltd.,
826, 58th Street East, Saskatoon, SK S7K 5Z4, Canada
e-mail: Hamed.akhiani@psca.mhps.com

Sami Penttilä

VTT Technical Research Center of Finland,
Kemistintie 3, Espoo FI-02044 VTT, Finland
e-mail: sami.penttila@vtt.fi

Jerzy Szpunar

University of Saskatchewan,
57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9, Canada
e-mail: Jerzy.szpunar@usask.ca

Manuscript received June 10, 2015; final manuscript received September 29, 2015; published online February 29, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Thomas Schulenberg.

ASME J of Nuclear Rad Sci 2(2), 021008 (Feb 29, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: NERS-15-1114; doi: 10.1115/1.4031817 History: Received June 10, 2015

In this study, we evaluated the oxidation resistance of austenitic stainless steels 316L and 310S in two different environments: air at 600°C and atmospheric pressure and supercritical water at 600°C and pressure of 25 MPa. Results indicated that both alloys showed good oxidation resistance in air by producing a protective oxide layer on their surface. In addition, alloy 310S exhibited lower weight gain during air oxidation compared to alloy 316L due to its higher content of chromium and nickel. Oxidation of alloy 310S in supercritical water was much lower than that of alloy 316L because of the formation of a protective layer of Mn2CrO4 spinel on the surface. No protective scale was formed on the surface of the alloy 316L, as magnetite (Fe3O4) and iron-chromium spinel (FeCr2O4) were the product of oxidation in supercritical water.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the supercritical autoclave system (Reprinted from Journal of Corrosion Science, Vol 94, Majid Nezakat, Hamed Akhiani, Sami Pennttilä, Seyed Morteza Sabet, Jerzy Szpunar, Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on Oxidation of Austenitic Stainless Steel 316L in Supercritical Water, pp. 197–206, Copyright (2015), with permission from Elsevier.)

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Fig. 2

ϕ2=0  deg, 45 deg, and 65 deg sections of the ODF of hot-rolled stainless steels 316L and 310S

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Fig. 3

OIM map of hot-rolled stainless steels 316L and 310S

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Fig. 4

Main orientations and fibers observed in steels

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Fig. 5

Weight change of stainless steels 316L and 310S in air and supercritical water

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Fig. 6

X-ray diffraction patterns of stainless steels 316L and 310S after oxidation in air at 600°C and atmospheric pressure as well as supercritical water at 600°C and 25 MPa

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Fig. 7

SEM micrograph, EDS elemental composition maps, and line scan of stainless steel (a) 316L and (b) 310S after 1000 hr of oxidation in air at 600°C and atmospheric pressure

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Fig. 8

EBSD band contrast and EDS elemental composition of stainless steel 316L after exposure to supercritical water at 600°C and 25 MPa for 1000 hr

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Fig. 9

SEM micrograph, EDS elemental composition maps, and line scan of stainless steel 310S surface after exposure to supercritical water at 600°C and 25 MPa for 1000 hr

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Fig. 10

Stainless steel 316L after exposure to supercritical water at 600°C and 25 MPa. Left: oxide surface appearance of the samples after 100, 300, and 1000 hr of oxidation; right: SEM micrograph at spallation edge for the sample after 1000 hr of oxidation

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