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Technical Brief

TRICO II Core Inventory Calculation and its Radiological Consequence Analyses

[+] Author and Article Information
J. L. Muswema

Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa,
P.O. Box 190, Kinshasa KIN XI,
Democratic Republic of the Congo
e-mail: jeremiemuswem@yahoo.fr; jeremie.muswem@unikin.ac.cd

G. B. Ekoko, J. K.-K. Lobo

Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa,
P.O. Box 190, Kinshasa KIN XI,
Democratic Republic of the Congo

V. M. Lukanda

Faculty of Science, University of Kinshasa,
P.O. Box 190, Kinshasa KIN XI,
Democratic Republic of the Congo;
Democratic Republic of the Congo’s General Atomic Energy Commission,
P.O. Box AE1,
Democratic Republic of the Congo

E. K. Boafo

University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
P.O. Box 385, Oshawa, ON L1H 717, Canada

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received March 04, 2015; final manuscript received September 13, 2015; published online February 29, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Michal Kostal.

ASME J of Nuclear Rad Sci 2(2), 024501 (Feb 29, 2016) (4 pages) Paper No: NERS-15-1024; doi: 10.1115/1.4031772 History: Received March 04, 2015; Accepted September 13, 2015

Two severe accident scenarios are investigated in this paper as they have never been considered previously in the safety analysis report (SAR) of the Congo TRIGA Mark II research reactor (TRICO II) in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo. The source term is derived from the reactor core after two postulated accidents: (1) a large plane crash with total destruction of the reactor building and (2) full damage of one fuel element while the reactor building remains intact. Total effective dose (TED), after core inventory, and dose profiles to human organs are derived to assess the operational safety of the reactor. Results from the study will be used to upgrade the current SAR of the reactor as the reactor safety and licensing concepts are changing over the years; the knowledge and lessons learned from the past experience are being updated accordingly with the available data. TEDs to workers of the facility show that higher values are obtained at areas near the source term at the time of the plane crash accident, which dies out as quickly as the plume is carried away following predominant meteorological conditions at the site. The situation with one fuel element totally damaged poses no threat as far as radiation protection is concerned and reveals a maximum TED of 1.30×107  mSv at 100 m from the reactor core. This shows that the operation of this type of research reactor is reliable and safe.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Downwind plume centerline target CED due to 25 selected nuclides versus downwind receptor location (LLI: lower large intestine; SI: small intestine; ULI: upper large intestine)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Target organ CED due to Cs-137, I-131, and Sr-90 as a function of downwind location (LLI: lower large intestine; SI: small intestine; ULI: upper large intestine; except lung: 47 mSv at 30 m of the source)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Organ CED profile due to 25 selected nuclides versus downwind distance (LLI: lower large intestine; SI: small intestine; ULI: upper large intestine)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Organ CED profile due to 25 selected nuclides versus downwind distance

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Organ CED profile due to Cs-137, I-131, and Sr-90 versus downwind distance

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