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research-article

Analysis Method for Impact and Dispersion Behavior of Water-Filled Tank

[+] Author and Article Information
Hidekazu Takazawa

Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1, Omika, Hitachi, Ibaraki 319-1292, Japan
hidekazu.takazawa.te@hitachi.com

Kazuma Hirosaka

Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1, Omika, Hitachi, Ibaraki 319-1292, Japan
kazuma.hirosaka.zp@hitachi.com

Katsumasa Miyazaki

Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1, Omika, Hitachi, Ibaraki 319-1292, Japan
katsumasa.miyazaki.xs@hitachi.com

Norihide Tohyama

Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., 3-1-1, Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-0073, Japan
norihide.tohyama.tp@hitachi.com

Naomi Matsumoto

Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., 3-1-1, Saiwai, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-0073, Japan
naomi.matsumoto.sv@hitachi.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040432 History: Received October 30, 2017; Revised May 16, 2018

Abstract

A new Japanese nuclear regulation requirement prepares estimating the possible damage to plant structures due to intentional aircraft impact. Aircraft impact needs to be considered in existing nuclear power plants. The structural damage and fuel dispersion behavior after aircraft impact into plant structures can be estimated using finite element analysis (FEA). FEA needs validated experimental data to determine the reliability of results. In this study, an analysis method was validated using a simple model such as a cylindrical tank. Numerical simulations were conducted to estimate the impact and dispersion behavior for a water-filled cylindrical tank. The simulated results were compared with the test results of the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Simulations were carried out using a multipurpose FEA code LS-DYNA®. The cylindrical tank was modeled using a shell element, and filled water was modeled using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) element. First, two analysis models were used to estimate the effect of the number of SPH elements. One was generated with about 300,000 SPH elements. The other was generated with 37,000 SPH elements. The cylindrical tank ruptured in the longitudinal direction after impact into a rigid wall, and the filled water dispersed. Few differences emerged in the simulated results using different numbers of SPH elements. The impact test of the VTT was simulated with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) element to consider the air-drag. The analytical dispersion pattern and history of dispersion velocity ratio agreed well with the impact test results.

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