This paper will investigate the feasibility of adopting innovative design concepts that could decrease the dependence on bonded insulated joints for railway track monitoring. First, the purpose of insulated joints and their historical usage are examined. Next, designs that utilize track circuits are discussed. This will be followed by a section on acoustic methods, reflectometry, and robotics.

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